Interview – Julian Ruppel, Sound Technician

Blazing lights, the stamping of feet, the clapping of hands, the music that gives you Goosebumps. The crowd fixated on the band taking the stage. But what about the people that make it happen?  Leah Curtis at Feast had a chat with Julian Ruppel, a young sound technician from Germany, about what it’s like to work in the job.
1. Hi Julian! A lot of people know you as the sound technician for the Stuttgart Metalcore band “We Set Our Dreams”. How did this come about?
Hi Leah! Yes, you’re right. I met the boys at a gig that they were playing, and where I was booked to do the live sound. Something sparked between us and since then I’ve been on the road with them and did the sound for them at their EP release show in March.
2. Wow! You went on tour with the boys when they released that EP (Humanity). How was it for you?

I had a great time with the boys. During the tour, the relationship between us changed from job to friendship. I enjoy being on the road with them. It was nice to see that the time they put into “Humanity” really paid off, it’s a great EP with great songs.
3. You created your own Events Company (Stay True), which came about whilst you were still doing an apprenticeship and working part time at a venue. Was it hard to juggle all of these things at once?
It was alright. “Stay True” is primarily a project to be able to show what I can do, to apply myself as a sound technician, but also to be able to put on shows that aren’t too expensive, but still have an amazing line-up. But I spent a lot of my free time on it, so it wasn’t too hard to do everything.
4. How long have you been doing this kind of thing? What made you want to get into the job?

I’ve been doing it for nine years now. Back when I first started it was the technical side and my interest n music that got me into it. I don’t play an instrument, so I started on the mixing desk and found out that I enjoyed it.
5. Sounds great! Is it sometimes difficult to work with bands or are there any arguments with members of the gig audience?
It’s only difficult when the bands get it into their heads that what the sound guy is saying means nothing and then don’t listen to you. That’s where there’s sometimes an argument. I never really get into arguments with members of the audience, most of the time they just complain about how loud it is (and these are the people who are standing right next to the PA, so it’s no wonder) or they’re just drunk and endanger the equipment with drinks.
6. One last question. Do you have any advice for any budding sound technicians?
Don’t let anyone tell you how to work. Everyone has their own way and “style” of how the do it.
Thank you for your time Julian! I wish you all the best and good luck!
No problem! Was a pleasure and thank you!

Posted by Leah Curtis